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THE WEREWIF
Written by Michael Wakcher and Gwydhar Bratton
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BOYS & BERRIES
By Alejandro Morales
RAINBOW WARRIORS
Written and created by Manuel Ríos Sarabia
Pencils by Gared Campos
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THE FEARLESS ZOMBIE HUNTERS
Written and Created by Manuel Ríos Sarabia
Art by Gared Campos
Lettering and tweaking Sadhaka
SAINT CARRIE OF THE DIVINE PAGEANT
Story and Lettering by Brian Andersen
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THIS GAY EXISTENCE
by Adam Fair
PINK TIE
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ANOTHER TIME
By Richard Crockett
BORDERLINE
Lorin Arendt
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MY BEST FRIEND IS GAY
by Jessica Zimmer
AARON FREY
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UNABASHEDLY BILLIE
Words and Pictures by Brian Andersen
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LOVE, DEATH, AND UFOS
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Writer and Artist: Rick Dilley
EMANCIPATION
Tony Smith, Story & Letters
Rick Withers, Original Pencils & Inks
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SPARKLE #1: THE LOST PAGES
Paige & Kevin Alexis (PKA)
LOVE
Written and drawn by Matt Fagan
ANGLE #1: THE LOST PAGES
Paige & Kevin Alexis (PKA)

Queer Eye on Comics
CARD TRICK
Posted February 24th, 2013
"A GENERAL FAVORITE"
Posted February 17th, 2013
HEARTS AND POWERS
Posted February 10th, 2013
"CONVERSION PERVERSION"
Posted February 3rd, 2013
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WHEN HORROR INTRUDES – PART 2
Posted October 31st, 2012
WHEN HORROR INTRUDES – PART 1
Posted October 30th, 2012
ASTONISHING X-MEN #50
Posted May 22nd, 2012
THE INITIATION #2
Posted March 24th, 2012
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SAVE THE DATE! AN INTERVIEW WITH MARVEL'S DANIEL KETCHUM ON NORTHSTAR'S WEDDING
Posted May 22nd, 2012
COMING OUT IN COMICS
Posted November 19th, 2010
BLONDE AMBITION THE AMAZON WAY
Posted September 12th, 2010
PAM HARRISON INTERVIEWS CO-RECIPIENTS OF THE 2010 PRISM COMICS QUEER PRESS GRANT
Posted August 30th, 2010
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External Features
ALA’S GLBT ROUND TABLE HONORS GAY-THEMED GRAPHIC NOVELS
Posted January 30th, 2014
on Robot 6
The Over the Rainbow Project, sponsored by the American Library Association's Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Round Table, announced its 2014 book list, containing works recommended for adults that “exhibit commendable literary quality and...
NEW QUEER COMICS ANTHOLOGY WILL BRING TOGETHER ARTISTS FROM ACROSS THE GLOBE
Posted October 12th, 2013
on Daily Xtra
New queer comics anthology will bring together artists from across the globe
HIV TAKES CENTER STAGE IN NEW COMIC OUT THIS WEEK
Posted June 29th, 2013
on Graphic Policy
PAUL KUPPERBERG ON "LIFE WITH ARCHIE" AND HIS NEW KEVIN KELLER NOVEL
Posted April 17th, 2013
on Comic Book Resources

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Ten Queeries with Allan Heinberg
by José Villarrubia
[Print-ready Version]

Allan Heinberg needs very little introduction to the visitors of this site. The Eisner Award nominated writer of Young Avengers is tackling Wonder Woman next for what could be the hit series of this year.

  1. You started of in the world of theater as both an actor and a playwright. One of your one-act plays, The Amazon's Voice, involved, according to The New York Times, "a cartoonist who has been asked to reconcieve the character of Wonder Woman for today's audience." Had you read Robert Rodi's novel What They Did to Princess Paragon? It has a similar premise, but it is a comedy... and is life imitating art now that you are doing Wonder Woman?

    I started writing The Amazon's Voice in 1993—having just gotten back into comics after ten years away—and inspired by having read George Perez's landmark run on Wonder Woman pretty much in one wide-eyed sitting. I only learned about Mr. Rodi's novel after having finished my first draft, but I read it right away, enjoyed it thoroughly, and was hugely relieved to see that his smart, funny book was entirely different from mine, despite the similarity of their premises. For me, the reinvention of Wonder Woman was merely a jumping-off point for what was essentially a twenty-year history of my slightly larger-than-life relationship with my mother.

  2. In a great interview on Wordballoon.com you said that Wonder Woman has been your favorite character since you were seven. What do you think is great appeal of this character for gay men? And do you think that it is mostly the Lynda Carter TV version that they love?

    I think part of Wonder Woman's appeal to gay men might be that—as powerful as she is—she's still an outsider. Even within the superhero community. She's an all-powerful woman in Patriarch's World and, because of that, she's always going to be viewed as a threat to the perceived "natural order of things." But what's inspiring about Wonder Woman to me is that she never allows her "marginalized" status to get in her way. She is exactly who she is at all times. Even her uniform—which has rankled feminist readers over the years—can be viewed as sending a message that she confidently embraces her femininity and sexuality in a powerful, inspiring way.

  3. Wiccan and Hulking are, IMHO, the cutest couple, gay or not, in comics. Apollo and Midnighter and Phat and Vivisector are the only other gay superhero couples I can think of… and they never have been written by an openly gay writer. Do you think your sexual orientation affects how you write these characters?

    I have a pronounced tendency to write from personal experience, so my sexuality absolutely influences how I write those characters. But that's also true about the way I write Kate Bishop and Patriot, as well. For me, relationships are relationships. The specifics might vary (straight, gay, synthezoid, alien), but the human and emotional dynamics are universal.

  4. Your writing and interviews show clearly that you are very well versed in mainstream comics. Do you read other kinds, such as alternatives, Manga or European comics?

    I'm ashamed to admit that I'm not as well versed in alternative, European, and Manga comics. But recommendations are always welcome.

  5. I will be glad to make some suggestions. Other than Wonder Woman, do you have any other dream projects in comics? A character you would just love to write, or an artist you'd love to work with?

    I have a Barbara Gordon/Batgirl OGN I'm hoping to write for DC at some point. And I'd love to spend more time working on Jessica Jones at Marvel, if Brian Bendis doesn't mind. And my list of favorite artists is long, but a few of the names on it are Mike Allred, David Mazzucchelli, Duncan Fegredo, Stuart Immonen, Phil Jimenez, Jim Lee, Alex Ross, Steve Rude, Ryan Sook, Mike Turner, J.H. Williams and many more.

  6. Batgirl and Jessica Jones... it seems like you have a preference for women characters. There's a long tradition of gay writers and filmmakers, from Tennessee Williams to Almodovar, who are best known for their women characters. Do you relate to their work at all?

    Absolutely. I love Almodovar's work, especially Women on the Verge... and Law of Desire. His screwball, romantic comic sensibility and tremendously soulful humanism have made him one of my favorite filmmakers. And the sublime pain and poetry of Williams' work humbles me, as well. And Truman Capote's.

  7. I am playing "Moonriver" from Breakfast at Tiffany's as I type this... Young Avengers is a great story for long-time Marvel readers familiar with continuity (like me). Have you gotten any feedback from readers new to Marvel? Are you concerned with making your stories accessible to readers not well versed in the characters' histories?

    My goal with Young Avengers was to make sure that, while the book remains deeply rooted in Avengers continuity, we keep any necessary exposition minimal and simple. And I usually try to include bibliographical references in the letters column to encourage readers to read the source material.

  8. That's a wonderful idea! So here is a geeky question: can you tell us if Wanda will be seen again in Young Avengers? And do you think that the fact that her children are alive will affect the events of House of M?

    If everything goes according to plan, Wanda will indeed return to Young Avengers early in Season Two, when Billy and Tommy embark on a search for the true source of their powers.

  9. Personally, I can't wait! You write more or less regular characters for the screen and mostly superpowered characters for the printed page. Do you have any plans to write superheroes for the screen?

    Not at present. I'm working on a medical drama called Grey's Anatomy right now—and developing a non-super-powered pilot for ABC for next season.

  10. Is there anything in particular you would like to tell Prism Comics readers, any messages for gay and lesbian readers?

    Only that I'm extremely pleased and proud to be a part of such an extraordinarily supportive community of writers and artists. Thanks, José!

    Thank you so much for your time, Allan, and best of luck in all your projects!


Allan Heinberg has been a writer and producer on Party of Five, Sex and the City, and Gilmore Girls, as well as Co-Executive Producer on the Fox network's series, The O.C.

José Villarrubia is an Eisner Award-nominated painter/photographer/digital artist and serves on the Prism Comics Advisory Board. A long-time Baltimore resident, he is currently spending a year in Paris.

Prism Comics promotes the works of the LGBT community in comics. It does not implicitly endorse any other material or products associated with those works. Any opinions expressed are those of the author(s).


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